Thursday, 23 April 2009

Hazy daze

Last weekend went far better than I could have hoped that it would. Absolutely everything went to plan! And it had been planned with military precision. Fortunately we have done the trip down to Sussex enough times, now, to have got the routine of it sorted to a 't'. My husband and I had a good journey down to Sussex. We spent the night at Forest Row which is a very pretty village not far from where my mother lived. It is a typical Sussex village of tile hung elevations, black and white timbers and yellow sandstone cottages. I wished that I had taken my camera but I forgot it. We stayed at the 15th century Chequers Inn, pictured right. Inside it is all old beams and brick open fireplaces. We had a good meal there on Saturday evening, followed by a good night's sleep. Then on Sunday morning we packed up my mother and set off back to Chester.

As we got my mother out of the car at the home, the manager of the home came out to meet her, offered her her arm, which she took and walked straight into the home without any problems! The nurse who manages this home is amazing. She has told me that she has been working there for ten years and has recently had a baby, but she looks as if she has just left school. It is not just the policemen who are getting younger! She was so good with my mother. She was like putty in her hands. The possible problems that I had envisaged just did not happen. At the end of last week, when the staff at the home could see how worried I was about actually getting my mother into the home, they assured me that they would be able to handle her. I didn't doubt them but I was not totally convinced as my mother used to be very awkward at times. They made it all look so easy.

Mum is now settling into the home, but is very confused as to where she is and is hoping that my brother will collect her and take her home, this coming weekend! He won't. I have spent most of my time this week looking for clothes for my mother. The home requires that her clothes can be machine washed then tumble dried. Most of what she currently owns is hand wash or dry clean only. Then everything needs to have her name in it. The home has ordered name tapes for her but for now I am using my old school name tapes, cutting off my first name and just using the surname. This last week has disappeared in a haze. It is probably just as well that I can not remember too much about it and I know that my mother can't, as by Monday she had no recollection of the events of Sunday, for which I am grateful.

I am sorry that at the moment I am not managing to visit your blogs but hope to resume visiting as as soon as I get my mother sorted out.

18 comments:

Akelamalu said...

It must be a great relief to have gotten your Mum settled. I found it slightly sad that she has to give up her hand wash and dry clean clothes (obviously quality) but machine washable clothes are more practical I suppose.

Don't worry about blog visiting we'll still be here! :)

Maternal Tales said...

I'm so pleased that things ran smoothly. What a relief for you x

Sniffles and Smiles said...

Don't even give it a second thought...we totally understand ...you've got your hands very full right now. None of us expect you to visit right now...I'm so glad that you got your mum settled, and hope that things continue to go very smoothly for you as you tie up all the loose ends! ~Janine XO

Maggie May said...

I am pleased that the move went well and that your mum is as settled as she can be in her new home. It must be very unsettling for you all.
Don't worry about blogging. We are not going anywhere.

Lindsay said...

I am glad the move went smoothly. My dad has to have all his clothes marked and we quickly ran out of the name tapes I had ordered. Some clothes are marked with my brother's school name tapes which included the school house he was in! My name tapes have also been used. My dad's laundry is collected and returned within 12 hours and is really efficient.

French Fancy said...

Oh I am so glad it is done. I bet you are in a bit of a state though - the anticipation and then the relief that it all actually went ahead as planned.

Never worry about coming to visit me - I know the strain you have been under and it is just nice to see a post up here telling us you are alright.

CG said...

I'm glad your mum is in a nice home. Like Akelamalu I felt a sense of sadness about her clothes but I can see the need for easy-care stuff.

Gill - That British Woman said...

I agree it must be a relief that she is well cared for. It must be such a worry, I hope that if I am in the same cirumstance, I can handle it as well as you have.

Gill in Canada

Rob-bear said...

Wow! The weekend from H**l that wasn't! Staff sound wonderful, and the fact that your mom seems to be fitting in is just great. Lots more to do, I know, but at least things are coming together.

As for visiting, we know you're there and will be back when you're ready and able.

Blessings.

Gilly said...

That home sounds a really nice one. I do hope your Mother settles in well.

Yes, I can remember having to buy new clothes for my mother to be machine washed and tumble dried!! be warned, most staff seem to do the wash on a hot wash! We found poly-cotton was best - totally manmade fibres seemed to crumple in the tumble drier.

Good luck!!

Jan said...

Glad your mother now settled.
It must be wonderful for you.
Having been through this, I know a bit how you feel...

Carol and Chris said...

I'm glad that you've got your Mum settled....it's not an easy thing to go through *hugs*

Don't worry about the blog...we'll all still be here when you get back :-)

C x

HER ON THE HILL said...

The phrase 'second childhood' could not be more appropriate could it? Buying clothes, sewing on name tags, nurturing - the young grow into strong adults and then become weak and helpless again as the toll of the years takes over. My heart goes out to you and your mother. Such a difficult time. I'm so glad the move went smoothly.

I was born and bred in Sussex just a few miles down the road from Forest Row, so know it well. I was born in Hurstpierpoint and moved to Haywards Heath when I was seven then on to Lindfield when I was 15. My parents and mother in law still live there and I was there at Easter. It's a lovely part of the world, so different from up here. I love them both for those very differences.
Good luck with everything.
x

Catharine Withenay said...

Glad the move went well and your mum is settling in so comfortably. It must be a great weight off your mind.

Strawberry Jam Anne said...

So pleased that last Sunday went so well for you all CW. Hopefully, now you have your mother closer you will be able to relax a little about it all. Wishing you all the very best with it. A x

cheshire wife said...

Thank you all, for your kind comments. You have all been very kind.

Akelmalu & CG - my mother's clothes were once good but now most of them have seen better days and this is an opportunity to buy some new clothes.

Lindsey & Gilly - thank you for the tips.

Her on the Hill - my parents retired to Lindfield from Yorkshire. Then after my father died my mother moved to East Grinstead to be near my brother. It is a lovely part of the country.

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